MN Zoo 5-30-14

Is it just me, or has it been a while since I’ve visited the zoo and wrote about something other than our wild horses? Don’t get me wrong, I have plenty of blog ideas, but after hearing about all the changes happening in the Pryors I could use a break and an impromptu visit to the zoo yesterday was just what I needed.

My mom and I started the trip off right by arriving as the school groups were leaving. As we approached the entrance and schemed about where we would go first, we passed tired kids and their chaperones. Then, once in the zoo, we decided to visit the Minnesota Trail first.

One of the first animals we saw was the beavers, and yes that’s beavers, plural.  Both beavers were out, but only one was active. While one of them whittled a stick, the other napped. Then, when the napping beaver got poked with the stick, it looked at us sleepily.

The beavers were funny to watch out of the water. They did a lot of waddling.

The beavers were funny to watch out of the water. They did a lot of waddling.

As we continued along the trial, we noticed other sleepy animals. The only one that was even remotely alert was the Lynx. There was a sign alerting visitors of kittens, but they weren’t out yet. Instead the Lynx on exhibit was very observant of guests, but maybe I’ll be able to see the kittens on my next visit.

The Lynx was sitting by the glass looking at the people.

The Lynx was sitting by the glass looking at the people.

Next, on the way to Russia’s Grizzly Coast, we passed the pond. It’s always fun to see the areas that the zoo has left for habitat, and the turtles were especially active. There were quite a few painted turtles, and they all seemed oblivious to the log-like snapping turtles. Then, the snapping turtles would slowly turn their heads and the painted turtles would dart away. The result was almost like a slow, underwater dance. We watched for a long time before eventually heading to Russia’s Grizzly Coast.

The snapping turtle slowly opens its mouth.

The snapping turtle slowly opens its mouth.

 

Then, they react to each other as if doing a dance.

Then, they react to each other as if doing a dance.

One of the bears was in their pond, and it looked like he was doing bear yoga. He seemed to be having a great time as he stretched his legs and groomed himself.  Next, we stopped by the leopards. Two of them were together, I’d imagine for breeding, and although I was hoping for some interesting behavior, they mostly paced. Despite that, I’ve always enjoyed seeing the leopards, and hope the zoo can continue breeding them.

He seemed to enjoy this stretch.

He seemed to enjoy this stretch.

Then, he woud perodically lick himself. Who knew bears were so flexible?

Then, he would periodically lick himself. Who knew bears were so flexible?

One of the two leopard paces while guests watch.

One of the two leopard paces while guests watch.

After Russia’s Grizzly Coast we headed to the Northern Trail. We stopped by favorite exhibit: the Przewalskii Horses. Like most of the animals they were conserving energy.  They mostly stayed near the water, but it was still fun to see them. We decided to move on.

I enjoyed the way the way the water reflected when the horse drank.

I enjoyed the way the way the water reflected when the horse drank.

On the way out of the zoo we passed the moose and tigers. I often pass by those exhibits, but we decided to stop. The moose wasn’t too active, but when we moved on to the tigers one of them was by the water. The tiger seemed to be debating what to do with the water, but turned away instead. After the tiger gave us one last look we left the zoo making it a great end to a fun visit to a zoo.

The tiger looks up from the water. A good end to a great visit.

The tiger looks up from the water. A good end to a great visit.

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2 Comments »

  1. Beautiful photos, Livi! It sounds like a good day. Those turtles are too funny!


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