Kenya’s Band

Since the roads were drier the next morning, we decided to try a different two-track. I vaguely remembered that during my last trip to the Peaks, we had good luck once we found water, so we went down a two-track that I hoped would be the correct direction. Once down the road, I was pleased to be proven correct.

After all the time searching for mustangs, water was a welcome sight, but we were curious to see more of the road. As we continued to navigate around the pond we saw a sorrel horse. I don’t know the horses well, but as we got closer, it quickly became apparent we were looking at the stallion Kenya. His flaxen mane was filled with windknots, and made his appearance distinct.

Kenya checks us out.

Kenya checks us out.

At first, Kenya stood alone, but another horse appeared from behind a nearby ridge. She was also sorrel, but darker and with a small blaze. She seemed curious about us, perhaps a little too much, so we backed up. Once she appeared, Kenya seemed more alert, and they both checked us out.

Kenya's young mare Jenk's views us with wary curiosity.

Kenya’s young mare Jenk’s views us with wary curiosity.

Although they never relaxed completely, they did turn away from us. Keeping our distance, we followed. They were headed in the direction of our car, and we thought it might be a good time to head back. The band seemed new, not quite settled into their roles, but still fun to watch.

Kenya takes one last look before moving his mare away.

Kenya takes one last look before moving his mare away.

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