Removal Thoughts

Recently the bait trap removal started in the Pryors. For some of us, this isn’t a new practice, and we have an idea of how it works. Most, however, seem unsure of what’s going on. Which is why I thought it might be beneficial to make a list of tips for responding to removals.

1. Know your facts. With so many people responding, the comments that will be the most good for the horses are ones that are the best researched. Before any management decision is implemented an EA is drafted, so for all the information that is the best place to look. However, if people don’t want to read through all of it, or have trouble understanding it, then scanning through the comments can be beneficial. Often people will have similar questions, so chances are yours has already been answered.

For example, only horses ages 1-3 are being removed in the Pryors.

For example, only horses ages 1-3 are being removed in the Pryors.

2. Remain objective. Removals are stressful times for everyone, but that doesn’t mean yelling will help. Even if you disagree with someone, please try to keep comments respectful. Most people agree that a future where all horses remain wild would be ideal; we just have different ways of getting there. We’re not going to make that future happen if we don’t hear each other out.

It will be hard to see which Cloud offspring will be removed, but he and Feldspar have been very prolific. It is unfair to the other horses on the mountain to think he will somehow get special treatment.

It will be hard to see which Cloud offspring will be removed, but he and Feldspar have been very prolific. It is unfair to the other horses on the mountain to think he will somehow get special treatment.

3. Look at the big picture. It’s hard to see any horse go, but once they’re removed they will be offered for adoption. Unless there is a compelling reason, removed horses won’t be rereleased. Once horses are removed, the best we can do for them is to make sure they get great homes.

Norma Jean is one of several Greta foals. I imagine the reason why she or one of her siblings hasn't been removed has to do with how wary their bands are.

Norma Jean is one of several Greta foals. I imagine the reason why she or one of her siblings hasn’t been removed has to do with how wary their bands are.

4. Keep the long-term herd health in mind. Everyone has their favorite horse, it sucks when they’re removed, but that alone is not a compelling reason to keep a horse on the range. For the most part the removal decisions have been made based on genetics. The horses have been well documented, so the lines that have the most representation on the mountain have been well documented. People are welcome to try and get preference for there favorites, but I think the tier system is fairly well set. To try and keep removed horses wild will distract from them finding homes.

I'm bummed that Nye got removed, but now I just want to help her find the best home for her.

I’m bummed that curious Nye got removed, but now I just want to help her find the best home for her.

5. Remember to breath. I risk repeating myself when I say this, but removals stress everyone out. Sometimes comments that would be harmless other times can be perceived as “nasty.” Not all comments are worth responding to. Sometimes it can be better to wait and see if the comment seems more reasonable. If the comment still seems offensive, then sometimes the best practice is to delete it.

If you guys are still stressed  heres a pretty photo of the Dryhead to make it all better.

If you guys are still stressed heres a pretty photo of the Dryhead to make it all better.

I know as people get to know the horses more, removals don’t get easier, but hopefully this list helps. The horses have weathered worse storms than this. If they can adapt, so can we.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s